Cervical Spine Injuries Course   6 hours - $42

Neck and back pain account for many of the radiological exams performed on patients in the U.S. The course focuses on spine anatomy, the effects of aging on the spine, common sources of pain, traumatic injuries, and diseases. 

Course Objectives: 
Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:

1. Describe major anatomical structures of the spine.

2. Explain common causes of spine trauma.
3. Describe issues involving pediatric patients.
4. Describe arthritis and its effect on the spine.
5. Identify various radiographic positions used in imaging the cervical spine.
6. Describe normal spine anatomy.

7. Identify various
types of fractures involving the spine.
8. Describe spinal stabilization techniques used for treating spinal fractures.

Course Contents:
Section 1- Cervical Spine Anatomy
Section 2 - Imaging
Section 3 - Evaluation of the Cervical Spine
Section 4 - Spinal Cord Injuries
Section 5 - Cervical Spine Traummatic Injuries
Section 6 - Pediatric Injuries       
Section 7 - Treatment of Cervical Spine Injuries

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INJURIES of the UPPER & LOWER EXTREMITIES


Those who perform x-ray imaging typically spend a major portion of their career dealing with various aspects of bones and joints. The course focuses on basic bone anatomy, composition, function, development, and effects of aging of bones. We will discuss diseases that affect the skeletal system.

Course Objectives: 

Upon completion of this course, the learner will be able to:
1. Describe major anatomical structures of the skeletal system.

2. Explain how the process of ossification occurs.
3. Describe the steps in normal bone development and recycling.
4. List the various types of fractures seen in the skeletal system.
5. Describe the mechanism of injury for various fracture types.
6. Explain the process of normal bone healing and remodeling.
7. List various treatments used to stabilize fractured bones.
8. Describe arthritis and differentiate between various types.
9. Identify various radiographic positions used in imaging the skeletal system.
10. List various fractures of the lower extremity.

11, Describe fractures of the upper extremity.

Course Contents:

Section One- Bones and Joints
Page 1 - Objectives
Page 2 - Terms
Page 3 - Ossification
Page 4 - Bone Marrow & Components of Blood
Page 5 - Bone Development
Page 6 - Effects of Aging
Page 7 - Case Scenario

Section Two - Classification of Fractures
Page 1 - Classification of Fractures
Page 2 - Causes of Fractures
Page 3 - Mechanism of Fracture
Page 4-8 Types of Fractures

Section 3 - Fracture Healing & Bone Repair
Page 1 - Stages of Bone Repair
Page 2 - Healing
Page 3 - Complications
Page 4 - Fracture Treatment
Page 5 - Radiographic Evidence of Healing

Section 4 - Joints
Page 1 - Overview
Page 2 - Joints
Page 3 - Joint Injuries
Page 4 - Classification of Fractures
Page 5 - Dislocation
Page 6 - Arthritis

Section 6 - Fractures of Upper Extremities
Page 1 - Injuries of the Phalanges and Metacarpals
Page 2-3 - Fractures of the Phalanges, Metacarpals and Carpals
Page 4 - Salter-Harris Epiphyseal Separations
Page 5-6 - Fractures of the distal Forearm and Wrist
Page 7-8 - Fracture and Dislocation of the Elbow
Page 9 - Fractures of the Forearm
Page 10-11 - Injuries of the Humerus and the Shoulder
Page 12-13 - Radiographic Views of the Humerus and Shoulder

Section 6 - Fractures of the Lower Extremity
Page 1 - Lower Extremity Fractures
Page 2-3 Fractures of the Pelvis
Page 4 - Visceral Injuries
Page 5 - Hip Fractures
Page 6-7 - Intertrochanteric Fractures
Page 8 - Fractures and Dislocations o f the Knee
Page 9 - Tibial Plateau Fracture
Page 10 - Fractures of the Patella
Page 11 - Injuries of the Tibia and Fibula
Page 12 - Ankle Injuries
Page 13 - Smith-Harris Epiphyseal Separations
Page 14 - Foot Injuries

 

 

 

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Radiation Safety Course   7.5 hours    $52

 Since radiation adversely affects people, we must be able to measure its presence. We also need to relate the amount of radiation received by the body to its physiological effects. Not all types of radiation have the same biological effect on living tissue, even if the amount of dose is the same. There are many technical factors that determine the clarity, detail, and diagnostic usefulness of each x-ray image. Those who perform x-ray examinations have the important responsibility to perform radiographic procedures in a safe manner, minimizing radiation exposure to the very lowest level necessary to obtain diagnostic films. Physicians rely on x-rays to supply information necessary for accurate diagnosis and treatment. There are a number of things the radiographer can do to minimize patient radiation exposure.

Course Objectives:
By the end of chapter 1, the student should be able to:

1. Describe the following terms: Rad, Rem, Roentgen, Sievert, Becquerel, Gray, and Curie.

2. Describe the relationship between the above units of measurement. 

3. Recognize the various types of radiation monitoring devices used to measure occupational exposure.

4. Describe the maximum permissible occupational exposure.

By the end of chapter 2, the student should be able to:

1. Describe how x-rays are produced within an x-ray machine.

2. Describe the parts of an x-ray tube.

3. Explain the anode-heel effect.

4. Describe what a tube warm-up is and why it is important.

5. Describe a tube rating chart and what it is used for. 

6. Describe various components of the x-ray tube and list how each contributes towards generating x-rays. 

7. Describe differences between single-phase and three-phase energy.

By the end of chapter 3, the student should be able to:
1. List the possible interactions x-rays may have with matter.
2. Recognize what the inverse square law is and how it applies to x-ray examinations. 
3. Describe primary and secondary shielding.
4. Select shielding devices used for patient and employee radiation protection. 
5. Describe important safety measures used by x-ray technologists to minimize exposure.

By the end of chapter 4, the student should be able to:
1. Identify essential safety measures used to minimize radiation exposure to patients.
2. Describe common devices used in x-ray beam filtration and how each is used. 
3. Describe differences between inherent and added filtration and why each is important.
4. List common devices used to shield patients from unnecessary x-ray exposure.

By the end of chapter 5, the student should be able to:

1. Describe the following terms: Rad, Rem, Roentgen, Sievert, Becquerel, Gray, and Curie.

2. Describe the relationship between the above units of measurement. 

3. Recognize the various types of radiation monitoring devices used to measure occupational exposure.

4. Describe the maximum permissible occupational exposure.

By the end of chapter 6, the student should be able to: 
1. Define radiographic technique.

2. Define kVp and it's influence on a radiographic image. 

3. Define mAs and it's influence on a radiographic image.

4. Describe how exposure time effects the radiographic image.

5. Identify the relationship between the inverse square law and radiographic technique.

By the end of chapter 7, the student should be able to:
1. Describe the construction, properties and handling of an intensifying screen.
2. Describe the construction, properties and handling of x-ray film.
3. List the properties, construction and uses of grids.
4. Discuss the relationship between screens, film and exposure factors (technique). 
5. Identify various types of compensating filters and describe how they influence the image. 
6. Describe factors which influence radiographic detail.

By the end of chapter 8, the student should be able to:
1. Describe the process(s) by which nuclear power is generated.
2. Describe the risks and handling of nuclear fuel and nuclear waste.
3. List the major nuclear accidents that have occurred to date.
4. Discuss the relationship between our increased needs for electrical power, and the building of new power plants
5. Describe the risks versus benefits of nuclear power plant construction.  
6. Identify safety features used in construction of nuclear power plants.
 

 

 

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